12-12-2014 Spy Update

Spy Softball 12/11/2014

IRONY
On Wednesday, while the Washington Post and other news media were awash with the Senate Democrats report on Extraordinary Interrogation Techniques, the obituary page noted the death of Ernie Brace, who was held captive longer than any US citizen during the Vietnam war. After his capture in 1965, he was held 3 1/2 years in a bamboo cage by North Vietnamese soldiers before being transferred to the infamous Hanoi Hilton, where he was put in a cell where he was next to John McCain, now a U.S. senator from Arizona. Brace was put in the infamous tiger cages, tortured etc.

NFCA 2015 Hall of Fame
2015 NFCA Hall of Fame Class to Feature, Evans, Kubicka and Myers
LAS VEGAS, Nev. – The NFCA announced its 2015 Hall of Fame class at the conclusion of its annual Hall of Fame banquet and reception on Friday evening at Planet Hollywood. The trio of inductees includes Texas A&M head coach Jo Evans, Montclair State head coach Anita Kubicka and Auburn head coach Clint Myers. They will be inducted into the Hall of Fame at the 2015 NFCA National Convention held in Atlanta, Ga.
Jo Evans, Texas A&M (Utah & Colorado State)
Jo Evans has made her mark on Texas A&M softball, taking it from a team with a lot of history into a formidable contender on the national stage. One of the winningest active Division I coaches in softball today, Evans has guided the Aggies to a program-best No. 2 national ranking and a school-record 32 straight NCAA tournament appearances since 2002.
Entering her 19th season, Evans has led the Aggies to three Big 12 titles (2005 regular season and 2008 regular season and tournament), 14 NCAA Regional appearances (including 12 straight) and five NCAA Super Regional appearances.
In her tenure, Texas A&M has advanced to the NCAA postseason 15 times, including two consecutive trips to the Women’s College World Series (WCWS) in 2007 & 2008. The three-time Big 12 Coach of the Year claimed her 1,000th career coaching victory this year at home against Wisconsin on Feb. 28, during the Texas A&M Invitational.
Posting a 709-344-2 (.672) mark under Evans, the Aggies have recorded 18 straight, 30-win seasons, including eight 40-win seasons and a program-best 57 wins in 2008.
Evans began her head coaching career at Colorado State University in 1986, following two seasons as an assistant coach at Florida State. She led CSU to a 91-67 mark during her four-year stint, collected back-to-back High Country Athletic Conference Coach of the Year honors her final two seasons and was chosen as the Central Region Coach of the Year in 1989.
Evans returned home, to Utah, in 1991 to take over at her alma mater. The two-time WAC Coach of the Year as well as the West Region Coach of the Year, Evans directed the Utes to the WCWS in just her second year, back-to-back WAC regular season and tournament titles and two WCWS appearances.

Anita Kubicka, Montclair State
Anita Kubicka’s teams have won 30-plus games 16 times, including 12 of the last 15 campaigns, and she has led the Red Hawks to 14 NCAA tournament appearances over that span. That includes five trips to the Division III Softball Championship, where Montclair State was the 1997 runner-up and earned third-place finishes in 1992 and 2012. In addition, the Red Hawks have won seven Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) championships and Kubicka has collected several New Jersey Athletic Conference (NJAC) and Regional Coach of the Year honors.

Over the past four seasons, few teams have enjoyed the success that Kubicka’s teams have achieved, winning 82 percent of their games and posting an 159-34 record, including three straight 40-win seasons. Montclair State won the 2013 NJAC championship and has reached the NCAA Division III Softball Championship the last three years. The Red Hawks have twice set the school mark for wins in a season (44 in 2012 and 46 in 2013) and have regularly been ranked in the top 10 of the NFCA’s Top 25 poll, including spending several weeks at No. 1 in 2013.
Just a year after joining Montclair State, Kubicka guided the Red Hawks to a third-place finish in the 1992 NCAA Division III Softball Championship. Montclair State earned the final regional berth and won four straight games, including three in one day, to advance. Four years later, the Red Hawks reached championship game, and came within a run of winning the title in a 2-1 loss to Simpson College. She surpassed the 700-win mark in 2012, with a 5-0 victory over Ramapo in the opening round of the NJAC Softball Championship.
Kubicka also played a major role in the construction of a softball stadium that gave her team a first-class facility to match its success on the field. In October, Kubicka was inducted into the Montclair State Athletic Hall of Fame for her service not only as softball coach, but also assistant athletic director.
A 1984 graduate of Trenton State (now The College of New Jersey), Kubicka played on the Lions’ 1983 national championship squad and earned her master’s degree at the University of Massachusetts, where she was an assistant softball coach for three seasons.

Clint Myers, Auburn University (Arizona State/Central Arizona College)
Clint Myers, who is entering his second year at Auburn has enjoyed a very successful 18 years as a collegiate softball coach. He has won two NCAA Division I National Championships and six more at the Junior College level, while amassing 943 wins.
Myers made an immediate impact upon his arrival at Auburn. He led the team to 42 wins, the second-most in one year in Auburn softball history, and the NCAA regional final. The program made vast improvements as the offense skyrocketed to some of its highest totals in program history and the defense tied for the second best percentage in the NCAA.
At Arizona State, Myers captained the Sun Devils to national titles in 2008 and 2011, and made the trip to WCWS in Oklahoma City seven times in eight years. Under his guidance, ASU averaged 53 wins per season and won 60-plus wins twice. He became the third coach in Sun Devil softball history to amass 400 victories.
The Bismarck, N.D. native, spent 19 highly successful years coaching Central Arizona College’s baseball and softball teams. From 1987-95, Myers built a record of 481-43 (.917 winning pct.) as the skipper of the softball program, winning six national titles, including a string of five straight from 1988-1992. A six-time NJCAA national coach of the year, Myers was also selected as the National Softball Coaches Association (NSCA) regional and National Coach of the Year in 1990, 1991 and 1992.
Myers was inducted into the NJCAA Softball Hall of Fame in 1998 and the Arizona Softball Foundation Hall of Fame in 2001.
A 1976 graduate of Arizona State, Myers was a member of the Sun Devil baseball team from 1970-73 and played on the College World Series runner-up squads in 1972 and 1973. In addition, he was a third –round MLB draft pick of the St. Louis Cardinals in 1973.
Leading British major events company appointed to bring electrifying look, atmosphere to Premier 12

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The World Baseball Softball Confederation (WBSC) announced today that The Works has been appointed to design the official look, including Fanzones, of the first edition of The Premier 12, which will be staged in November 2015.

The Works, who has developed the official look for some of the world’s biggest sports properties, including 2014 FIFA World Cup, UEFA Champions League Finals and the 2014 FIVB Men’s & Women’s World Championships, will manage the brand design and complete artwork rollout for the new flagship pro baseball world championship that will feature the Top 12 National Baseball Teams in the world.

“The WBSC is thrilled to partner with industry leaders like The Works to develop a universally appealing and exciting look that not only captures but enhances what The Premier 12 brand represents, and collectively elevates the profile of the WBSC,” said Masaru Yokoo, WBSC Baseball Marketing Director.

The Premier 12 platform, which uses the Top 12 in the WBSC World Baseball Rankings as the qualification method, will award the highest amount of world ranking points of any international baseball event, positioning the world championship as baseball’s grand prix and distributing US$ multi-millions in prize money.

The Works CEO Roy Webber said: “We are delighted to have been appointed by the WBSC. Baseball is one of the world’s biggest sports, and our team is particularly excited with this new challenge. We aim to deliver an official look and rollout that will reflect the global appeal and the position of this exciting new world championship platform.”

WBSC’s appointment of The Works’ follows last week’s agreement in which London-based MP & Silva outright purchased the exclusive worldwide distribution and sponsorship rights of the 2015 and 2019 editions of Premier 12.

The Premier 12 logo and 2015 tournament dates will be unveiled at upcoming press conference in January.

NPF Announces Extended Relationship With “Just Softball”
Nashville, Tennessee – December 11, 2014 – National Pro Fastpitch announced today an extended relationship with “Just Softball” and its president, Deb Hartwig. Hartwig is set to oversee operations of the Championship Series and Special Events for the league. This is an extension of Hartwig’s current position with NPF as Director of the Championship Series.
“Deb Hartwig has been an integral part of operating our Championship Series since 2011,” commented NPF Commissioner, Cheri Kempf. “Throughout that time period, Deb has exhibited the utmost organization and leadership in handling the event that means the most to our teams, owners and players. It is an important step for the league to utilize the expertise of Deb Hartwig and her company, “Just Softball” in the capacity of event management as the league continues to grow.”
Since 2010, NPF has developed and grown the season culmination, Championship Series. Each year, the event has grown in size and scope from television coverage to the annual awards banquet to the venue capacity. In 2014, the Championship spent its first year at the Hoover Metropolitan Stadium in Hoover, AL – a venue with a seating capacity of 10,000. From 2011 to 2013, the Series had its final game(s) broadcast live nationally on ESPN2. In 2014, CBS Sports added live coverage of 3 of the 4 days of the Championship Series. Hartwig has overseen the Series in the position of Director since 2011.
Another primary event for NPF is the annual College Draft. This event takes place in the spring of each year and has been held in Nashville, Tennessee at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum since 2013. Like the Series, the event has continued to grow in size and scope, specifically over the past 5 years. The Draft is typically a live-streamed event that captures national attention as college seniors, their teams and families, along with NPF team fans throughout the country tune in to see where the stars of college softball will play professionally.
The League continues to explore additional special events for future coverage and to enhance partnerships. An annual All Star game, international championship, and Fall Exhibition Tour are all possibilities.

 

12-12-2014 More on IOC 2020 Agenda

Olympic Agenda 2020 – From Decision to Implementation

Following the unanimous approval of the 40 recommendations that make up Olympic Agenda 2020 by the IOC Session on 8 and 9 December, the focus has now turned from decision to implementation.

On Thursday 11 December, IOC President Thomas Bach chaired meetings at the IOC headquarters in Lausanne to begin the implementation of a number of the recommendations, including on the bid process for the Olympic Games (Recommendation 1) and on the launch of an Olympic Channel (Recommendation 19).

The IOC President said: “Following the success of the IOC Session in Monaco and the unanimous endorsement of my fellow IOC members for the Olympic Agenda 2020 recommendations, it is critical that we utilise the momentum and energy we have created throughout the Olympic Movement and start implementing straight away.”

Olympic Agenda 2020 recommendations will be fully applied in the bid process for the Olympic Games 2024, which opens on 15 January 2015. A new invitation phase will be offered to cities interested in hosting the Games, so that they can discuss their initial interest with the IOC. The Olympic Winter Games 2022 bid process is already underway, but elements of Olympic Agenda 2020 will be implemented where possible, especially with regard to the IOC assisting bid cities in reducing costs and ensuring a sustainable legacy.

One of those who took part in the year-long consultation process, which involved key stakeholders as well as those from the world of business and NGOs, was Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman of Google. He took part in the Olympic Agenda 2020 Working Group on “Olympism in Action”. He said: “I’m happy to have participated, and very much looking forward to seeing the IOC put its new initiatives into action. It’s an exciting time for technology and the Olympic Movement. I was pleased to see the IOC, a more than 100-year-old organisation, take the initiative and open itself to fresh ideas as it looked ahead to the year 2020.”

Following a meeting on the Olympic Channel launch, the IOC President reiterated the importance of the Channel in providing a platform for the promotion of Olympic sports, athletes and the Olympic values beyond the period of the Games: “Interest in the Olympic Games is higher now than ever, and recent editions have enjoyed record broadcast audiences around the world. The idea of the Channel is to harness this interest and extend it beyond the Games, in a way that will engage audiences, especially young audiences, in the power of what sport can do.”

Dick Ebersol, the renowned American Olympic television executive producer for twenty years and former Chairman of NBC Sports, attended the Olympic Channel meeting as a special adviser. After the meeting, he said: “More than 20 years ago in conversations with the then IOC leadership, we talked about a mutual dream of creating a year-round Olympic channel. I wholeheartedly applaud President Bach’s vision and successful initiative this week in bringing it to fruition. The media landscape has changed enormously in recent years, in particular with the uptake of digital media. There is much more opportunity today to reach and connect with audiences everywhere on earth, in particular young people. I jumped at this opportunity to be involved on one condition…that my role be unpaid, as I want to repay in some small way the joy the Olympics have given me since childhood.”

A feasibility study on launching an Olympic Channel was conducted prior to the Olympic Agenda 2020 vote, and following unanimous approval by the IOC Session, on 8 December, for the launch of the Olympic Channel, work has now begun on its implementation. The Channel, produced by OBS, will initially be a worldwide digital offering; however as linear (traditional TV) distribution opportunities arise, these will also be assessed.

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12-9-2014 Summer Decision on Olympic Softball in 2020

SUMMER DECISION ON SOFTBALL 2020
Sources: IOC and Chicago Tribune

(IOC) The IOC agreed to abolish the cap of 28 sports for the Summer Olympic Games and move to an events-based system that would allow new competitions to come in, while keeping to about 10,500 athletes and 310 medal events. Host cities will be allowed to propose the inclusion of one or more additional events for their games.
(Tribune) The IOC signed off on changes that would allow the Tokyo 2020 Olympic organizers to resurrect baseball and softball, pushed off the Olympic sports program after 2008.
If, as expected, Tokyo asks the IOC to add those sports, which are very popular in Japan, and possibly squash as well, the approval could come at the regularly scheduled IOC meeting in July. Reuters reports that the IOC will likely approve the addition.

The probable decision could come earlier.  Yoshiro Mori, president of Tokyo2020, said today he expects Tokyo2020 will present its plans for staging the Games in a report to the IOC in February.  The Wall St Journal  predicted today that, in addition to softball and baseball, Tokyo2020 might include squash and karate.

Skateboarding and racketball have been supported for 2024.
“It is not sure for baseball and softball, because most other federations are against this,” Francesco Ricci Bitti, head of the Association of Summer International Sports Federations, told several Italian journalists.
The World Baseball Softball Federation reacted with predictable joy.
“Today, there is there is great hope that our athletes will now have a real opportunity — the pinnacle and highest honour in our sport — to play for their country, aiming to win an Olympic gold medal,” WBSF President Riccardo Fraccari said in a statement.
(Spy) Having previously predicted Japan would add softball and baseball to the 2020 program, Spy renews its call for ISF, WBSF, and ASA to start planning now on how to organize and finance participation in these games.

WBSC Comment

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — The World Baseball Softball Confederation (WBSC) joins the worldwide chorus of support following the successful reception and endorsement of key Olympic Agenda 2020 reforms at the extraordinary IOC session in Monaco today, particularly regarding the adoption of a more flexible Olympic sports programme.

 

On behalf of the worldwide baseball and softball family, WBSC President Riccardo Fraccari congratulated and thanked IOC President Thomas Bach, the IOC Members and working groups for leading and driving the reforms, which sport experts say will open a new chapter in world sport.

 

“The WBSC fully shares the IOC’s vision of Olympic reform under President Bach, and stands ready to support and assist the Olympic Movement in implementing the reforms, wherever baseball and softball can help,” President Fraccari said.

 

“Above all the Olympic Games is the world’s most inspirational sporting event, and the Agenda 2020 reforms will inspire more young people and women, who are the future of all sports, to take up more sport and to participate in sport and in the values of sport, and make sport more relevant to the next generation, and as a catalyst for change in our communities and societies,” President Fraccari said.

 

President Fraccari indicated that the WBSC would wait for guidance and direction from the IOC and the Tokyo 2020 organisers to determine how the new reforms could involve baseball and softball.

 

As potential Olympic sports, baseball and softball — sports that embody and promote gender-equality — would also help to take the Olympic values and focus on sport to 65 million players and 250 million fans at all levels worldwide, and make the Olympic Games more relevant in more regions of the world where baseball and softball are growing in popularity, especially among young people and women, and have become national sports.

 

President Fraccari said that as the world governing body overseeing baseball and softball, the WBSC is humbled by the opportunity provided by the reforms to be included in the Olympic Games which enable future Olympic host cities and organising committees, including Tokyo 2020, to include additional sporting events in the Olympic sports programme, which could potentially include baseball and softball, two of the most popular sports in the world that have experienced a wave of global development in recent years.

 

The new more flexible approach to Olympic sport approved by the IOC session has provided a massive boost of optimism and hope that the changes could result in baseball and softball joining the Olympic Games sports programme.

 

“It’s like when the manager calls you off the bench to pick up the bat and warm up, and the bases are loaded,” President Fraccari said. “All you want to do is swing for the fences!

 

“Today, there is excitement circulating around the baseball and softball world and there is great hope that our athletes will now have a real opportunity — the pinnacle and highest honour in our sport — to play for their country, aiming to win an Olympic gold medal.

 

“The reforms herald a new era for sports and athletes worldwide, and provide important hope and inspiration for sports and athletes wanting to participate in the world’s most important global sporting event, the Olympic Games,” said President Fraccari.

 

The world governing body leader was confident that if included, baseball and softball could significantly enhance the Olympic experience, building on the vast fan, player and community support levels for the bat-and-ball sports worldwide.

 

“While baseball and softball have very deep historic and contemporary connections in sporting communities and at all levels of society in Japan, the sports are experiencing worldwide popularity and growth, with new as well as existing and upgraded venues able to host the sports in both traditional and new markets in Africa, the Middle East as well as in Europe,” he said.

 

President Fraccari said the huge legions of young people and women who play and support baseball and softball at all levels across the world, along with strong sponsor, broadcaster and viewing audiences and support would increase levels of excitement and engagement at the Olympic Games.
President Fraccari said the WBSC had devised a new shorter and more compact format for Olympic baseball and softball which included the use of a shared and existing competition venue in order to ensure the baseball and softball events were sustainable and affordable and leave meaningful sporting and community legacies for young people and women after the Games.

12-8-2014 IOC

IOC Session unanimously approves Olympic Agenda 2020

The full membership of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) today unanimously approved the 40 recommendations that make up Olympic Agenda 2020, a strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic Movement, at the 127th IOC Session in Monaco.

“Olympic Agenda 2020 is like a jigsaw puzzle”, IOC President Thomas Bach said. “Now that you have approved all 40 recommendations you can see the whole picture. It is a picture of progress. It is a picture that ensures the uniqueness of the Olympic Games. It is a picture that promotes the Olympic values. And it is a picture that strengthens sport in society.”

The debate and voting on Olympic Agenda 2020 were scheduled to last two days, but such was the support for the 20+20 recommendations – with 83 interventions in total – that the process concluded on the first day.

Each recommendation, voted on individually, received the full backing of the 96 IOC members in attendance. There were no votes against and no abstentions. As an additional show of unity for Olympic Agenda 2020, the members gave their unanimous support for the entire set of recommendations in an en bloc vote at the close of today’s meeting.

President Bach, who initiated the Olympic Agenda 2020 discussions a year-and-a-half ago, thanked the Session on what he described as a “very important and positive day for the IOC and the Olympic Movement.”

“The speed at which Olympic Agenda 2020 was approved showed the great support and determination of the members to make it happen”, President Bach said during a press conference following the meeting. “It was a very, very positive surprise. But it followed over a year of constructive discussions. Some of the recommendations were not easy for certain members to swallow. Some may have hoped for no recommendation or a different recommendation on a specific issue. So it was encouraging that regardless of their individual interests or positions, they were determined to make Olympic Agenda 2020 a success. Speaking of the members, I have a great deal of respect for them to do this.”

 

12-7-2014 IOC Ex Bd 2020 Recommendations

OLYMPIC AGENDA 2020
20+20 RECOMMENDATIONS
Reference document
Introduction
Here are the 20 + 20 recommendations which will be discussed at the 127th IOC Session in
Monaco on 8 and 9 December.
Together, these 40 recommendations lay out the strategic roadmap for the future of the Olympic
Movement.
The recommendations address only the changes proposed for the future. If a policy is not
specifically mentioned, this means that it will be maintained.
The recommendations follow a year of discussions and consultations with all the stakeholders of
the Olympic Movement, as well as external experts and the public. They were also debated by the
126th IOC Session in Sochi, two Olympic Summits and the IOC commissions. More than 40,000
submissions were received from the public during the process, generating some 1,200 ideas.
They were finalised at the Executive Board meeting in October 2014, after presentations by the
chairs of the 14 Working Groups.
For further information, please refer to the full document provided to you in advance of the 127th
IOC Session, which contains details and context as well as the recommendations.
After the IOC 127th IOC Session, the IOC Executive Board will have the task of determining the
priorities for the implementation of the recommendations.
Olympic Agenda 2020 – 20+20 Recommendations
18 November 2014 Page 1/20
Reference document
20+20 Recommendations to shape
the future of the Olympic Movement
1. Shape the bidding process as an invitation …………………………………………………………. 4
2. Evaluate bid cities by assessing key opportunities and risks ………………………………….. 5
3. Reduce the cost of bidding ……………………………………………………………………………….. 6
4. Include sustainability in all aspects of the Olympic Games ……………………………………. 7
5. Include sustainability within the Olympic Movement’s daily operations ……………………. 7
6. Cooperate closely with other sports event organisers …………………………………………… 8
7. Strengthen relationships with organisations managing sport for people
with different abilities ……………………………………………………………………………………….. 8
8. Forge relationships with professional leagues ……………………………………………………… 8
9. Set a framework for the Olympic programme ………………………………………………………. 9
10. Move from a sport-based to an event-based programme ………………………………………. 9
11. Foster gender equality ……………………………………………………………………………………. 10
12. Reduce the cost and reinforce the flexibility of Olympic Games management ………… 10
13. Maximise synergies with Olympic Movement stakeholders ………………………………….. 10
14. Strengthen the 6th Fundamental Principle of Olympism ……………………………………….. 11
15. Change the philosophy to protecting clean athletes ……………………………………………. 11
16. Leverage the IOC USD 20 million fund to protect clean athletes …………………………… 11
17. Honour clean athletes …………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
18. Strengthen support to athletes ………………………………………………………………………… 12
19. Launch an Olympic Channel …………………………………………………………………………… 13
20. Enter into strategic partnerships ………………………………………………………………………. 13
Olympic Agenda 2020 – 20+20 Recommendations
18 November 2014 Page 2/20
Reference document
21. Strengthen IOC advocacy capacity ………………………………………………………………….. 13
22. Spread Olympic values-based education ………………………………………………………….. 13
23. Engage with communities ……………………………………………………………………………….. 14
24. Evaluate the Sport for Hope programme …………………………………………………………… 14
25. Review Youth Olympic Games positioning ………………………………………………………… 14
26. Further blend sport and culture ……………………………………………………………………….. 15
27. Comply with basic principles of good governance ………………………………………………. 16
28. Support autonomy …………………………………………………………………………………………. 16
29. Increase transparency ……………………………………………………………………………………. 16
30. Strengthen the IOC Ethics Commission independence ……………………………………….. 17
31. Ensure compliance ………………………………………………………………………………………… 17
32. Strengthen ethics …………………………………………………………………………………………… 17
33. Further involve sponsors in “Olympism in Action” programmes ……………………………. 17
34. Develop a global licensing programme ……………………………………………………………… 18
35. Foster TOP sponsors’ engagement with NOCs ………………………………………………….. 18
36. Extend access to the Olympic brand for non-commercial use ………………………………. 18
37. Address IOC membership age limit ………………………………………………………………….. 19
38. Implement a targeted recruitment process ………………………………………………………… 19
39. Foster dialogue with society and within the Olympic Movement ……………………………. 20
40. Review scope and composition of IOC commissions ………………………………………….. 20
Olympic Agenda 2020 – 20+20 Recommendations
18 November 2014 Page 3/20
Reference document
Recommendation 1
Shape the bidding process as an invitation
Introduce a new philosophy: the IOC to invite potential candidate cities to present an
Olympic project that best matches their sports, economic, social and environmental longterm
planning needs.
1. The IOC to introduce an assistance phase during which cities considering a bid will be advised
by the IOC about bid procedures, core Games requirements and how previous cities have
ensured positive bid and Games legacies.
2. The IOC to actively promote the maximum use of existing facilities and the use of temporary
and demountable venues.
3. The IOC to allow, for the Olympic Games, the organisation of preliminary competitions outside
the host city or, in exceptional cases, outside the host country, notably for reasons of
sustainability.
4. The IOC to allow, for the Olympic Games, the organisation of entire sports or disciplines outside
the host city or, in exceptional cases, outside the host country notably for reasons of geography
and sustainability.
5. The IOC to include in the host city contract clauses with regard to Fundamental Principle 6 of
the Olympic Charter as well as to environmental and labour-related matters.
6. The IOC to make the Host City Contract (HCC) public.
7. The HCC to include details of the IOC’s financial contribution to the OCOG.
8. Respect third-party legal interests by making contractual elements available on an “inconfidence”
basis.
9. The IOC to accept other signatories to the HCC than the host city and the NOC, in line with the
local context.
10. The IOC to provide the HCC at the outset of a given bid process.
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Recommendation 2
Evaluate bid cities by assessing key opportunities and
risks
The report of the Evaluation Commission to present a more explicit risk and opportunity
assessment with a strong focus on sustainability and legacy.
1. Introduce into the existing 14 Candidate City evaluation criteria a new criterion entitled:
The Athletes’ Experience.
2. The IOC to consider as positive aspects for a bid: the maximum use of existing facilities and the
use of temporary and demountable venues where no long-term venue legacy need exists or
can be justified.
3. The IOC, in collaboration with Olympic Movement stakeholders, to define core requirements for
hosting the Olympic Games. The field of play for the athletes to always be state-of-the-art for all
competitions and to form part of the core requirements.
4. The IOC to clarify the elements for the two different budgets related to the organisation of the
Olympic Games: long-term investment in infrastructure and return on such investment on the
one hand, and the operational budget on the other hand. Furthermore, the IOC contribution to
the Games to be further communicated and promoted.
5. The Candidate City Briefing to include an in-camera discussion between the IOC members and
the IOC Evaluation Commission.
6. The Commission to benefit from third-party, independent advice in such areas as social,
economic and political conditions, with a special focus on sustainability and legacy.
Olympic Agenda 2020 – 20+20 Recommendations
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Reference document
Recommendation 3
Reduce the cost of bidding
The IOC to further assist Candidate Cities and reduce the cost of bidding.
1. The Candidate Cities to be allowed to attend and make presentations only to:
• IOC members during the Candidate City Briefing,
• ASOIF/AIOWF respectively. This presentation may be combined with the Candidate City
Briefing,
• ANOC General Assembly preceding the vote,
• IOC Session at which the host city is elected.
2. The IOC to bear the following costs:
• costs incurred in relation to the visit of the IOC Evaluation Commission,
• travel and accommodation for six accredited delegates for the Candidate City Briefing to
IOC Members in Lausanne,
• travel and accommodation for six accredited delegates for the Candidate City briefing to the
ASOIF/AIOWF respectively,
• travel and accommodation for six accredited delegates for the ANOC General Assembly,
• travel and accommodation for 12 accredited delegates for the IOC Session at which the
host city is elected.
3. Publication of the Candidature File to be in electronic format only.
4. The IOC to create and monitor a register of consultants/lobbyists eligible to work for a bid city.
Formal acceptance of the IOC Code of Ethics and Code of Conduct by such
consultants/lobbyists as a prerequisite for listing in the register.
5. The IOC to give access to bid cities, upon their request, to the Olympic Channel, if the creation
of such Channel is approved.
Olympic Agenda 2020 – 20+20 Recommendations
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Reference document
Recommendation 4
Include sustainability in all aspects of the Olympic
Games
The IOC to take a more proactive position and leadership role with regard to sustainability
and ensure that it is included in all aspects of the planning and staging of the Olympic
Games.
1. Develop a sustainability strategy to enable potential and actual Olympic Games organisers to
integrate and implement sustainability measures that encompass economic, social and
environmental spheres in all stages of their project;
2. Assist newly elected Organising Committees to establish the best possible governance for the
integration of sustainability throughout the organisation;
3. The IOC to ensure post-Games monitoring of the Games legacy with the support of the NOC
and external organisations such as the World Union of Olympic Cites (UMVO).
Recommendation 5
Include sustainability within the Olympic Movement’s
daily operations
The IOC to embrace sustainability principles:
1. The IOC to include sustainability in its day-to-day operations
• The IOC to include sustainability in its procurement of goods and services, as well as
events organisation (meetings, conferences, etc.).
• The IOC to reduce its travel impact and offset its carbon emissions.
• The IOC to apply the best possible sustainability standards for the consolidation of its
Headquarters in Lausanne.
2. The IOC to engage and assist Olympic Movement stakeholders in integrating sustainability
within their own organisation and operations by:
• developing recommendations,
• providing tools, e.g. best practices and scorecards,
• providing mechanisms to ensure the exchange of information between Olympic
stakeholders,
• using existing channels, such as Olympic Solidarity, to help and assist in implementing
initiatives.
3. To achieve the above, the IOC to cooperate with relevant expert organisations such as UNEP.
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Reference document
Recommendation 6
Cooperate closely with other sports event organisers
Cooperate closely with other sports event organisers:
1. The IOC and the International World Games Association (IWGA) to closely cooperate regarding
the sports programme composition and their respective evaluations.
2. The IOC and the International Masters Games Association (IMGA) to study the possibility for
Olympic Games host cities to benefit from an option to organise the Masters Games in the
years following the Olympic Games.
3. The IOC to consider including a “sports lab” or sports initiation programmes as part of the
Olympic Games or Youth Olympic Games to trigger youth involvement and benefit the host
community.
Recommendation 7
Strengthen relationships with organisations managing
sport for people with different abilities
Strengthen relationships with organisations managing sport for people with different
abilities, with a view to exploiting synergies in all possible areas, including:
• Technical assistance
• Communication activities
• Promotion of events via the Olympic Channel
Recommendation 8
Forge relationships with professional leagues
Invest in and forge relationships with professional leagues and structures via the respective
International Federations with the aim of:
• Ensuring participation by the best athletes
• Recognising the different nature and constraints of each of the professional leagues
• Adopting the most appropriate collaboration model on an ad-hoc basis in cooperation with
each relevant International Federation.
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Recommendation 9
Set a framework for the Olympic programme
Set limits for accreditations:
1. The IOC to limit the number of athletes, officials and events for the Games of the Olympiad to
approximately:
• 10,500 athletes
• 5,000 accredited coaches and athletes’ support personnel
• 310 events
2. The IOC to limit the number of athletes, officials and events for the Olympic Winter Games to
approximately:
• 2,900 athletes
• 2,000 accredited coaches and athletes’ support personnel
• 100 events
3. The IOC to study ways in which the overall number of other accreditations at the Olympic
Games can be reduced.
Recommendation 10
Move from a sport-based to an event-based
programme
Move from a sport-based to an event-based programme:
1. Regular reviews of the programme to be based on events rather than sports, with the
involvement of the International Federations, and with the following restrictions to be respected:
• For the Games of the Olympiad: approximately 10,500 athletes, 5,000 accredited coaches
and athletes’ support personnel, and 310 events,
• For the Winter Games, approximately 2,900 athletes, 2,000 accredited coaches and
athletes’ support personnel, and 100 events.
2. The IOC Session to decide on the inclusion of any sport (IF) in the programme.
3. The IOC to allow the OCOGs to make a proposal for the inclusion of one or more additional
events on the Olympic programme for that edition of the Olympic Games.
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Recommendation 11
Foster gender equality
Foster gender equality
1. The IOC to work with the International Federations to achieve 50 per cent female participation
in the Olympic Games and to stimulate women’s participation and involvement in sport by
creating more participation opportunities at the Olympic Games.
2. The IOC to encourage the inclusion of mixed-gender team events.
Recommendation 12
Reduce the cost and reinforce the flexibility of
Olympic Games management
Reduce the cost and reinforce the flexibility of Olympic Games management
1. The IOC to establish a transparent management procedure for any change of requirements,
regardless of its initiator, in order to reduce costs.
2. The IOC with the stakeholders to systematically review the level of services, Games
preparation and delivery, with a view to containing cost and complexity. Regular proposals will
be made in this respect.
3. The IOC to consider the provision of turnkey solutions for OCOGs in areas which require highly
specific Olympic expertise.
Recommendation 13
Maximise synergies with Olympic Movement
stakeholders
Maximise synergies with Olympic Movement stakeholders to ensure seamless organisation
and reduce costs.
1. The IOC to enhance the role of the International Federations (IFs) in the planning and delivery
of the Olympic competitions, including the study of transferring technical responsibilities from
the OCOGs to the IFs.
2. The IOC to focus the role of the IOC Coordination Commission on key issues and validation of
service levels.
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Recommendation 14
Strengthen the 6th Fundamental Principle of Olympism
The IOC to include non-discrimination on sexual orientation in the 6th Fundamental
Principle of Olympism.
Recommendation 15
Change the philosophy to protecting clean athletes
The IOC’s ultimate goal is to protect clean athletes
Recommendation 16
Leverage the IOC USD 20 million fund to protect clean
athletes
The IOC to use its extra USD 20 million “Protection of clean athletes” fund:
1. USD 10 million to develop robust education and awareness programmes on the risks of matchfixing,
any kind of manipulation of competitions and related corruption.
2. USD 10 million to support projects offering a new scientific approach to anti-doping.
Recommendation 17
Honour clean athletes
Honour clean athletes who are awarded an Olympic medal following a doping case:
1. Formal ceremonies to be organised for medal-winners who receive their Olympic medal
following the disqualification of a competitor.
2. The ceremony to be properly communicated by all parties concerned.
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Recommendation 18
Strengthen support to athletes
Strengthen support to athletes:
1. The IOC to put the athletes’ experience at the heart of the Olympic Games.
2. The IOC to further invest in supporting athletes on and off the field of play.
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Recommendation 19
Launch an Olympic Channel
The IOC to launch an Olympic Channel.
Recommendation 20
Enter into strategic partnerships
The IOC to open up to cooperation and network with competent and internationally
recognised organisations and NGOs to increase the impact of its programmes.
Recommendation 21
Strengthen IOC advocacy capacity
Strengthen IOC advocacy capacity:
• The IOC to advocate to intergovernmental organisations and agencies.
• The IOC to encourage and assist NOCs in their advocacy efforts.
Recommendation 22
Spread Olympic values-based education
Spread Olympic values-based education
1. The IOC to strengthen its partnership with UNESCO to include sport and its values in school
curricula worldwide.
2. The IOC to devise an electronic platform to share Olympic values-based education
programmes of different NOCs and other organisations.
3. The IOC to identify and support initiatives that can help spread the Olympic values.
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Recommendation 23
Engage with communities
Engage with communities:
1. Create a virtual hub for athletes.
2. Create a virtual club of volunteers.
3. Engage with the general public.
4. Engage with youth.
Recommendation 24
Evaluate the Sport for Hope programme
Evaluate the Sport for Hope programme:
1. The IOC to evaluate the success and impacts of the Sport for Hope programme over the next
two to three years and, in the meantime, limit the programme to the two existing centres in Haiti
and Zambia.
2. The IOC to develop a sustainable operational model for the two existing Sport for Hope centres
and invite other NGOs to contribute their particular areas of expertise, with the goal of having
the centres become self-sufficient, managed and operated by another entity, and no longer
reliant on the direct heavy investment and support of the IOC.
3. The IOC to define further strategy of investment in locally adapted grassroots sport facilities,
building on the experience and lessons learned from the Olympafrica model.
Recommendation 25
Review Youth Olympic Games positioning
The IOC to review with the stakeholders the positioning of the Youth Olympic Games.
1. The IOC Executive Board to set up a tripartite commission with the NOCs and IFs to review in
depth the vision, mission, positioning, sports programme, Culture and Education Programme
(CEP), protocol, organisation, delivery and financing of the Youth Olympic Games, and to come
back to the IOC Session for final discussions and decisions.
2. The IOC to move the organisation of the YOG to a non-Olympic year, starting with the 4th
Summer Youth Olympic Games, to be postponed from 2022 to 2023.
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Recommendation 26
Further blend sport and culture
Further strengthen the blending of sport and culture at the Olympic Games and in-between.
1. At Games time:
• Create the Olympic Laurel award for outstanding contributions to Olympism (culture,
education, development and peace) at every edition of the Olympic Games. The award
ceremony to take place during one of the ceremonies. The recipient of the “Olympic Laurel”
to be nominated by a jury including independent highly respected personalities.
• Study the development of an Olympic House to welcome the general public to engage in a
dialogue with the Olympic Movement.
• Study an “Olympic Museum on the move” concept to introduce Olympic culture to the
general public in the context of the torch relay, live sites and/or the Cultural Olympiad.
• Develop an artists-in-residence programme.
2. Between Olympic Games:
• Study how to develop an impactful commissioned artists programme to engage a steady
and authentic interaction with global cultural players and build a dynamic legacy.
• Encourage NOCs to appoint an “attaché” for Olympic culture.
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Recommendation 27
Comply with basic principles of good governance
All organisations belonging to the Olympic Movement to accept and comply with the Basic
Universal Principles of Good Governance of the Olympic and Sports Movement (“PGG”).
1. Such compliance to be monitored and evaluated. Supporting tools and processes can be
provided by the IOC in order to help organisations become compliant with the principles of good
governance, if necessary.
2. Organisations to be responsible for running self-evaluation on a regular basis. The IOC to be
regularly informed of the results of the organisations’ self-evaluations. In the event of missing
such information, the IOC to request such an evaluation at its discretion.
3. The “PGG” to be updated periodically, emphasising the necessity for transparency, integrity
and opposition to any form of corruption.
Recommendation 28
Support autonomy
The IOC to create a template to facilitate cooperation between national authorities and
sports organisations in a country.
Recommendation 29
Increase transparency
To further increase transparency
1. The financial statements of the IOC to be prepared and audited according to the International
Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), even if these higher standards are legally not required
from the IOC.
2. The IOC to produce an annual activity and financial report, including the allowance policy for
IOC members.
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Recommendation 30
Strengthen the IOC Ethics Commission independence
The Chair and the members of the IOC Ethics Commission to be elected by the IOC Session.
Recommendation 31
Ensure compliance
The IOC to establish within the administration a position of a compliance officer, to:
1. Advise the IOC members, IOC staff, NOCs, IFs and all other stakeholders of the Olympic
Movement with regard to compliance.
2. Give advice on new developments with regard to compliance.
Recommendation 32
Strengthen ethics
The IOC Ethics Commission to review the Code of Ethics and its Rules of Procedure to be
fully aligned with the Olympic Agenda 2020 drive for more transparency, good governance
and accountability.
Recommendation 33
Further involve sponsors in “Olympism in Action”
programmes
The IOC to adopt measures for TOP Partners to be integrated into the funding, promotion
and implementation of IOC “Olympism in Action” activities and to strengthen sponsors’
recognition in this respect.
1. The IOC to define specifically which “Olympism in Action” programmes would help drive the
Olympic brand
2. The IOC to streamline “Olympism in Action” initiatives behind a few core ones which sponsors
can “anchor” onto and which align with the central vision of “building a better world through
sport”.
3. The IOC to review and understand what partnering with each TOP can offer in terms of
furthering the IOC “Olympism in Action” goals.
4. TOP Partners to be engaged by IOC TMS to co-construct future “Olympism in Action”
initiatives.
5. Enhance recognition of partners’ involvement in “Olympism in Action” programmes.
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Recommendation 34
Develop a global licensing programme
The IOC to develop a global licensing programme, placing the emphasis on promotion
rather than on revenue generation.
Recommendation 35
Foster TOP sponsors’ engagement with NOCs
The IOC to create a programme in view of increasing engagement between TOPs and NOCs.
1. The IOC to adapt tailor-made measures to increase TOP local activation and synergies with
NOCs. Support individual NOCs and sponsors in developing and increasing sponsorship
activations on a local level using the NOCs’ assets.
2. The IOC to create IOC Marketing Seminars for NOCs in collaboration with Olympic Solidarity
and ANOC to provide information on Olympic marketing and best practices. The seminar
programme for all NOCs will enhance and develop the marketing and servicing capabilities of
NOCs to engage with sponsors to better support and maximise sponsorship activations. The
existing training pool for NOCs will be a key component of the seminar programme.
3. The IOC to consider contractual obligations to be included in TOP Partner agreements to
facilitate TOP engagement with NOCs.
Recommendation 36
Extend access to the Olympic brand for noncommercial
use
Extend access to the Olympic brand for non-commercial use.
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Recommendation 37
Address IOC membership age limit
Address IOC membership age limit:
• The IOC Session, upon the recommendation of the IOC Executive Board, may decide a
one-time extension of an IOC member’s term of office for a maximum of four years, beyond
the current age limit of 70.
• This extension to be applied in a maximum of five cases at a given time.
• The Nominations Commission to be consulted.
Recommendation 38
Implement a targeted recruitment process
Move from an application to a targeted recruitment process for IOC membership:
1. The Nominations Commission to take a more proactive role in identifying the right candidates to
fill vacancies in order to best fulfil the mission of the IOC.
2. The profile of candidates to comply with a set of criteria – to be submitted by the Nominations
Commission to the IOC Executive Board for approval -, inter alia:
• The IOC’s needs in terms of skills and knowledge (e.g. medical expertise, sociological
expertise, cultural expertise, political expertise, business expertise, legal expertise, sports
management expertise, etc.)
• Geographic balance, as well as a maximum number of representatives from the same
country
• Gender balance
• The existence of an athletes’ commission within the organisation for representatives of
IFs/NOCs
3. The IOC Session to be able to grant a maximum of five special case exceptions for individual
members with regard to the nationality criteria.
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Recommendation 39
Foster dialogue with society and within the Olympic
Movement
Foster dialogue with society and within the Olympic Movement:
1. The IOC to study the creation of an “Olympism in Action” Congress that would take the pulse of
society every four years:
• Bring together representatives of the Olympic Movement, its stakeholders and
representatives of civil society.
• Engage in a dialogue with representatives from all walks of life and backgrounds on the
role of sport and its values in society.
• Discuss the contribution of the Olympic Movement to society in fields such as education,
cohesion, development, etc.
2. The IOC to turn the Session into an interactive discussion among IOC members on key
strategic topics, with interventions from external guest speakers.
Recommendation 40
Review scope and composition of IOC commissions
1. The President to review the scope and composition of the IOC commissions, to align
them with the Olympic Agenda 2020.
2. The IOC Executive Board to determine the priorities for implementation of the
recommendations.
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